This is a weekly update on Copyright and Entertainment Law.

Delhi High Court vacates stay order against Hindi dub of Telugu Film

The Delhi High Court has recently vacated its earlier order whereby it restrained the production company, M/s Sithara Entertainment, from releasing the Hindi-dubbed version of the Telugu film ‘Bheema Nayak’, which was itself a remake of a Malayalam film “Aayappanum Koshiyum”. The case was initiated against the producers of the Telugu remake, by JA Entertainment, a production company which had attained the exclusive rights to produce a Hindi remake of the Malayalam film. The suit alleged that as JA Entertainment was assigned the exclusive rights to the Hindi remake, the release of the Hindi-dubbed version of the Telugu version of the film was infringing upon such rights. The Delhi High Court initially passed a temporary injunction against the release thereof, but the decision was thereafter reversed, citing that as Sithara Entertainment was the copyright owner of the Telugu film, it had every right to exploit the same in the form of a Hindi-dubbed version. Such release would not in any way infringe upon JA Entertainment’s rights to produce the Hindi remake of the Malayalam film.

Ministry of Information and Broadcasting mandates ‘public interest announcement’ norms

The Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, in a recent advisory to all operating FM radio channels, has emphasised the various provisions of the Grant of Permission Agreement and the Migration of Grant of Permission Agreement, relating to the airing of public interest announcements. These agreements, which are signed by FM radio stations as a precursor to operating in India, mandate that all stations must air public interest announcements for a maximum of one hour daily, in proportionate time slots. The Ministry has also stated that failure to comply with the same would attract penalties to the FM radio stations.

Bombay High Court green lights release of Khuda Haafiz 2

Zee Studios’ latest release ‘Khuda Haafiz 2’ was recently allowed to be released vide a Bombay High Court order. The release of the film was initially challenged by a petition before the Bombay High Court filed by several Islamic organisations, claiming that the practice of Zajeer-ka-Matam was depicted in a negative light in the film’s trailer, and the same hurt the religious sentiments of the petitioners. The Bombay Hight Court, however, dismissed the petition and allowed the release of the film, after the council for the Central Board of Film Certification (CBFC) submitted that the filmmakers had adequately modified the film and certain song lyrics therein, as suggested by the CBFC. The scene depicting the practice of Zajeer-ka-Matam was allowed to be retained, however, as it was an event taking place in the background of the film. 

 

Authored and compiled by Varun Gopala Krishnan (Associate, BananaIP Counsels)


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Please note that the news bulletin has been put together from different sources, primary and secondary, and BananaIP’s reporters may not have verified all the news published in the bulletin. You may write to contact@bananaip.com  for corrections and take down.

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