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Author: BananaIP Reporter

BananaIP Counsels > Articles posted by BananaIP Reporter (Page 30)

Prior Art Search and Drafting Patents

Patent

This post was first published on 14th March, 2011.   The process of filing a patent involves two important steps before the application forms are prepared. The first step is prior art search and the second step is drafting of the patent specification.  Many a time, companies and inventors question the value of a prior art search before filing the patent. While some companies perform comprehensive prior art searches before drafting patent specifications, others do not carry out any search at all.  Both the approaches have advantages and disadvantages. Advantages The main advantages of performing a patent search before drafting are: a. Opinion on patentability; b....

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Cover Your Wickets – Leg Pad Patents

This post was first published on 12th March 2011.   Cricket is a popular sport played across the world. After India won the Cricket World Cup in 1983, the sport has gained so much of popularity in India that today every kid wants to be a cricketer. But cricketer are always prone to injuries. And these injuries can be fatal enough to ruin a flourishing career of a cricketer. There are some instances which shows that cricket can be a dangerous game if proper protective equipment is not used. One of the most sad and perturbing moments in cricket was when Raman...

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Patent Linkage – An Overview

gene Sequencing

This post was first published on 5th March, 2011. Authored by Mr. Vijaykumar Shivpuje. Abstract: Patent Linkage with regulatory approval procedure is a sensitive issue for Indian pharmaceutical industry which includes mainly generic companies. This essay discusses the implications of patent linkage and the current scenario in India. Further, the recent developments related to patent linkage including the Bayer v/s Cipla decision and India-EU free trade agreements are discussed. Introduction: Patent Linkage refers to the communication between the national regulatory authorities and the Patent Office to prevent marketing approval of generic drugs until after the expiration of patents covering the drug product or approved...

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A Bird’s Eye View of Hawk Eye

This post was first published on 4th March, 2011. A new debate is in the air after the humdinger of a match between India and England that ended in a tie in the ICC World cup 2011. The Indian team is unhappy with the dubious decision of the Umpire that ruled England’s Ian Bell not out and ultimately cost India the match. Umpires are an inseparable part of a cricket match. The umpire selection panel has selected 18 umpires excluding a reserve umpire so as to officiate the ICC Cricket World Cup 2011. There are many instances in the history of cricket...

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War Over Patent Ownership – Stanford v. Roche

  This post was first published on 3rd March, 2011.   The war between Stanford and Roche with respect to ownership of certain diagnostic processes is now being argued before the US Supreme Court. The dispute started with Stanford filing an infringement suit against Roche alleging infringement of its patents relating to methods for evaluating treatments for HIV.  Roche asserted that it was not liable for patent infringement because it has ownership in the patents on account of its take over of Cetus, a company that developed the methods. One of the inventors of the methods, Holodniy, joined Stanford in 1988 and started pursuing...

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Rain Ball for Uninterrupted Cricket Games

This post was first published on 3rd March 2011. Every cricket fan around the world must be enjoying cricket’s biggest festival - World Cup 2011. If we look at the cricket calendar, we come to know that the number of cricket matches played nowadays has increased staggeringly.  Cricket is played throughout the year in different forms i.e. Test, ODI, 20-20 and so on. Due to this some of the cricket tournaments have to be scheduled during monsoon time as well. Rain has always been an invincible force against cricket game.  Cricket is considered as a religion in India having vast followers,...

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Cricket – A Batsman’s Game (Mangoose Bat Patent)

This post was first published on 28th February, 2011. Nowadays, cricket is believed to be a batsman’s game. When people start playing cricket, they usually prefer to try their hands on batting more than bowling and fielding. This passion for batting is one of the main reasons why today cricket pitches are mostly flat and batsman friendly. The international cricketers are no exception and they have tried various things with their bat to improve their batting performance, some of them were also in the midst of controversies. Controversies related to bat started in the match between Surrey v Hampshire on September 1771, when...

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Innovation in Cricket – Snickometer Patent

This post was first published on 24th February, 2011. Cricket is said to be deeply rooted in tradition and considered to be a gentleman’s game. The game has undergone much transformation because of the innovation being implied into it. Innovation has touched the game in every field-the way game is played (20-20, ODI, Test), shape and size of bats, innovative batting and bowling techniques (the class of some individual genius like paddle sweep of Sachin Tendulkar, doosra of Saqlin Mustaq, Marillier shot of Douglas Marillier and so on) and so on. As innovative minds put their heads into the game, technology became...

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Generication of Public Interest

This post was first published on 18th February, 2011. Public Interest today is a potent weapon of generic companies to safeguard their interests in the changing patent landscape in India. India's membership to WTO required implementation of the product patent regime for drugs by 2005 and implementation of the obligation was opposed by generic companies in the name of public interest. It was argued that the introduction of such a regime would impede access to medicines and health care. The public consciousness and media's highlighting of the importance of access to AIDS and cancer drugs pushed the contention of Innovator companies...

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Marrying Open Standards and Open Source

The image depicts the Open Source logo

This post was first published on 16th February, 2011. Standards can either be open or closed based on the manner of their creation and their accessibility to the public. A standard that is created through public or community participation without any restrictions and can be used or implemented by any one are called open standards. A standard that is developed by and limited to one or more persons is a closed standard. All proprietary standards are closed standards. The basic tenets of open source software are availability of source code, rights to copy, modify and distribute the software, movement of license along...

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